SAN MATEO - HAYWARD BRIDGE



 
PROJECT CONTACT PERSONS
PROJECT MANAGER Helena "Lenka" Culik-Caro (510) 286 - 5759
PUBLIC AFFAIRS Anne Tobias (415) 989-1446 (EXT 12)
PUBLIC INFORMATION Greg Bayol (510) 286 - 4444


FACTS AT A GLANCE
 
 
LOCATION:  Highway 92 between San Mateo and Alameda Counties
LENGTH:  Steel Girder Spans (Highrise) 1.9 miles, Trestle portion 5.1 miles
SHIPPING CHANNEL SPAN:  750 feet
STRUCTURE:  Steel box girder and concrete trestle approach spans
VERTICAL CLEARANCE:  135 feet
OPENED TO TRAFFIC:  October 31, 1967
COST:  $ 70 Million
CURRENT AUTO TOLL:  $ 2.00
COLLECTION:  Westbound at Hayward
NUMBER OF TRAFFIC LANES BOTH DIRECTIONS:  Trestle Flat portion Four (4)/ No Shoulders 
Highrise Portion Six (6)/ No Shoulder
CURRENT AVG. DAILY TRAFFIC BOTH DIRECTION:  81,000 vehicles

THE ORIGINAL STRUCTURE

The original San Mateo-Hayward Bridge was the longest bridge in the world when it was completed in 1929. The bridge was two-lane, low-level structure, 35 feet in elevation. Trestle and truss spans were combined in building the bridge and a vertical lift section was added to allow ship traffic to pass through the structure. The remains of the original trestle is the 4000 feet long Werder Fishing Pier adjacent to the high - rise portion on the south side

By the late 1950's, traffic had increased markedly, creating congestion. Also, back-ups were caused during the operation of the lift span. In 1957, traffic was brought to a standstill an average of six times a day for large vessels traveling though the lift span opening. In addition, the reinforcing steel on the bridge's superstructure had suffered extensive corrosion, making continuous repairs necessary. These factors made a replacement bridge a necessity.
 

THE NEW 1957 BRIDGE

By 1961, an innovative concept of an orthotropic bridge was approved by the Toll Bridge Authority. Orthotropic, a combination of two terms: orthogonal and anisotropic, means that the structure has various stiffness properties at 90 degree directions. This innovation allows traffic to drive on the bridge structure itself, foregoing the need to pour a concrete deck.

The trestle flat portion of the bridge consists of two westbound and two eastbound lanes separated by a concrete barrier. The Highrise portion is a structure that is elevated at the channel span to a height of 135 feet allowing ships to easily pass below in a dredged channel. This section consists of three lanes in each direction. No shoulders exist on the Highrise or Trestle portion of the bridge.

Construction was completed in 1967 at a cost of $70 million. The bridge's smooth causeway design and arching elevated span are features that won it the American Society of Engineers' "Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Honor and the American Institute of Steel Construction's "Most Beautiful Bridge Long-Span" award. On the south side of the elevated span of the new bridge is a 4000ft. long section of the original 1929 bridge. It remains as a fishing pier, standing in bucolic relief next to the modern bridge.
 

PLANS FOR THE FUTURE - NEW TRESTLE

Between 1980 and 1993 the average daily traffic on the San Mateo/Hayward Bridge increased form 42,000 to 72,000, a 70 percent increase. This incredible increase can be attributed to the boom in industry and housing along the bay. By the year 2010 it is projected that 95,000 vehicles will be crossing the bridge in both directions.

Work should begin in the next year to construct a new parallel trestle bridge on the north side of the existing that will serve the west bound traffic with three travel lanes and shoulders on both sides. The existing trestle will be modified to serve the eastbound traffic with three lanes and shoulders on both sides. The east aproach from 92/880 interchange to the toll plaza will be also widened to three travel lanes in each direction with shoulders on both sides this completing six (6) continuous travel lane in both directions from route 101 to I-880 . There are no plans to improve the highrise portion of the bridge in the next 20 years.