Caltrans Excellence in Transportation Award Winners 2018

Share via:


Each year, Caltrans highlights the best of its work and the work of its partners through the annual Caltrans Excellence in Transportation Awards Program. Caltrans received nearly 100 entries from Caltrans districts and programs, public agencies, private contractors, and consultants across the state. Congratulations to everyone who worked hard to make these projects a reality by helping provide positive and measurable improvements in transportation, resulting in a lasting benefit to the state of California.

Intermodal Transportation System

State Route 89 Mousehole Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project

  • Town of Truckee
  • Caltrans District 3
State Route 89 Mousehole Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project Ribbon Cutting Event. Photo courtesy of Sefan McLeod, Stefan McLeod Photography.
State Route 89 Mousehole Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project Ribbon Cutting Event. Photo courtesy of Sefan McLeod, Stefan McLeod Photography.

The State Route 89 Mousehole Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvement Project constructed a 12-foot wide pedestrian and bicycle tunnel under the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) railway for bicycles and pedestrians who were previously sharing the railroad undercrossing with vehicle traffic. The project is located in the Town of Truckee in Nevada County and is immediately adjacent to the unincorporated portion of Placer County within Caltrans and UPRR right of way. Built in 1928, the existing 24-foot wide concrete vehicle tunnel is locally referred to as the Mousehole because of its arch shape. With two travel lanes of traffic and virtually no roadside shoulders, the absence of any pedestrian or bicycle facility through the Mousehole was of great concern to the community and the region. SR-89 is a heavily used access point connecting Interstate 80 to Lake Tahoe and Truckee.


The Highway (Rural)

Young’s Bar Wall

  • Caltrans District 1
  • Steelhead Constructors, Inc.
  • Yurok Culture Committee
  • Yurok Tribal Chair
Young’s Bar Wall on State Route 169, in Humboldt County, is designed to resemble the outside of a traditional redwood plank house. Photo courtesy of Phil Frisbie Jr., Caltrans District 1.
Young’s Bar Wall on State Route 169, in Humboldt County, is designed to resemble the outside of a traditional redwood plank house. Photo courtesy of Phil Frisbie Jr., Caltrans District 1.

In northeastern Humboldt County, approximately 10 miles west of Weitchpec, State Route 169 bisects the Yurok Indian Reservation. At that location, Caltrans worked with the Yurok Culture Committee, the Tribal Heritage Preservation Office, the Yurok Transportation Department, and various tribal members to develop a wall façade. This was a collaborative project intended to educate traveling motorists about the history and culture of the Yurok Tribe and to give a visual sense of the area. The wall is intended to resemble the outside of a traditional redwood plank house and required a safety rail and included a ‘sturgeon back’ design as a runner at the base.


The Highway (Urban)

SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project

  • Riverside County Transportation Commission
State Route 91 Improvement Project has enhanced the quality of life for commuters, local businesses and residents in Riverside County. Photo courtesy of Steve Jacobs, Jacob’s Media Services.
State Route 91 Improvement Project has enhanced the quality of life for commuters, local businesses and residents in Riverside County. Photo courtesy of Steve Jacobs, Jacob’s Media Services.

State Route 91 (“the 91”) in Riverside County ranks among the nation's worst commutes. Its 280,000 daily users and news reporters have dubbed it the “Corona Crawl,” due to its reputation for heavy traffic congestion. The Riverside County Transportation Commission began constructing the $1.4 billion SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in 2014. Using a first-of-its-kind design-build delivery method authorized by the state legislature, the project added the first express lanes to Riverside County, as well as general purpose lanes, auxiliary lanes and an express lane connector between the 91 and Interstate 15. The 91 Project is more than a transportation infrastructure investment, it has enhanced the quality of life for commuters, local businesses and residents. Since opening day, SR-91 Express Lanes users have been experiencing significant time savings. During fiscal year 2017/18, toll revenue of $24.6 million has far surpassed projected revenue of $9.2 million.


Major Structures

Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge

  • Caltrans District 5
  • Golden State Bridge, Inc
  • XKT Engineering, Inc.
  • Somerset Engineering
The new Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge on Highway 1 in Monterey County that replaced the original bridge after it was damaged in a landslide during the 2017 storms. Photo courtesy of Caltrans senior photographer Scott Lorenzo.
The new Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge on Highway 1 in Monterey County that replaced the original bridge after it was damaged in a landslide during the 2017 storms. Photo courtesy of Caltrans senior photographer Scott Lorenzo.

State Route 1 (SR-1) in Big Sur is designated an All-American Road under the National Scenic Highways and Byways program. While roads designated within this program are all unique, SR-1 through Big Sur is considered one of the crown jewels of the program. A landslide that followed the heavy January 2017 rains severely damaged the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge on SR-1 in Monterey County. The original concrete structure, built in 1968, was beyond repair and needed replacement. By February 15, Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge was closed, and SR-1 access to the Big Sur community was cut off from the north. Caltrans quickly determined that a single-span steel girder bridge would replace the structure spanning the 310-foot wide and 100-foot deep canyon. Incredibly, the initial bridge design was completed in just under three weeks, and the seamless partnership between Caltrans and the contractor helped complete processes quickly. To expedite construction, steel girders were pre-fabricated and assembled on site, then “launched” across the canyon. This was California’s first bridge launch on the state highway system. The new $24 million single-span steel girder bridge was opened to the public just eight months after the original concrete structure was condemned, a process that would normally take about 8 years.


Stewardship of the Environment

Elkhorn Highland Reserve Mitigation Site - Prunedale Improvement Project

  • Caltrans District 5
  • Elkhorn Slough Foundation
  • Transportation Agency for Monterey County
  • US Fish and Wildlife Service, Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office
Elkhorn Slough Foundation, Caltrans and Transportation Agency for Monterey County staff Elkhorn Highlands Reserve Mitigation Site, Dedication Ceremony on February 12, 2018. Photo credit: Nicoletta Lanese with the Monterey Herald (February 12, 2018)
Elkhorn Slough Foundation, Caltrans and Transportation Agency for Monterey County staff Elkhorn Highlands Reserve Mitigation Site, Dedication Ceremony on February 12, 2018. Photo credit: Nicoletta Lanese with the Monterey Herald (February 12, 2018)

Today’s complex environment frequently requires offsite mitigation to balance environmental effects from transportation projects. The Prunedale Improvement Project improved safety and traffic operations along a highly congested stretch of U.S. Highway 101 in northern Monterey County. The project was years in the making and a welcome improvement for the Prunedale community. It also required offsite mitigation for maritime chaparral, oak woodlands and wetlands that are habitat to several rare and endangered plants and animals. Finding a site that conserves natural resources can be difficult, so can finding partners willing to take on the long-term management responsibilities for a mitigation site. New legislation in 2011 and 2012 allowed Caltrans to transfer to the Elkhorn Slough Foundation land and the endowment for long-term management of the offsite mitigation. Caltrans’ partnership with the foundation resulted in permanent protection of 167 acres of wildlands known as the Elkhorn Highlands Reserve. Conserving the native plants at the reserve benefits the region, by playing an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and protecting water quality by reducing or eliminating soil erosion into the waterways. The Elkhorn Highlands Reserve shows how transportation projects can offer opportunities to expand the conservation value of a site by partnering with community organizations and promoting stewardship of California’s environment.


Transportation Related Facilities

Corning State Roadside Rest Areas

  • Caltrans District 2
  • California Highway Patrol, Red Bluff
  • Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.
  • Randy Hill Construction, Inc.
The new Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant Corning State Roadside Rest Areas on Interstate 5 replaced facilities originally constructed in 1971. Photo courtesy of Caltrans.
The new Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant Corning State Roadside Rest Areas on Interstate 5 replaced facilities originally constructed in 1971. Photo courtesy of Caltrans.

The traveling public rightfully expects a place to take care of basic needs, rest, and recharge when traveling California’s highways. Caltrans strives to provide safe, comfortable, convenient, and accessible rest area facilities to meet the ever-growing needs of highway users. The Interstate 5 Corning northbound and southbound rest areas no longer served that purpose and needed to be rehabilitated. Originally built in 1971, these facilities long outlived their expected 20-year design life and were unable to meet the needs of all users. After struggles with funding and awarding a construction contract, the project was finally completed in November 2017. The reconstructed comfort stations should meet drivers’ needs for at least the next 20 years. The areas incorporate recycling and reuse, simplistic cost-effective design, drought tolerant features, low maintenance landscaping, and eye-catching architectural features. Additional lighting and shared office space for the California Highway Patrol further enhance the safety and security of the facilities. Americans with Disabilities Act accessible facilities and compliant walkways make the entire facility accessible to all users.


Transportation System Operations Improvements

Holman Highway 68 Roundabout

  • City of Monterey
  • Omni-Means, a GHD Company
  • Harris & Associates
  • Transportation Agency for Monterey County
The Holman Highway 68 Roundabout in the city of Monterey. Photo courtesy of Ronald Boyle, PE, Omni-Means, a GHD Company
The Holman Highway 68 Roundabout in the city of Monterey. Photo courtesy of Ronald Boyle, PE, Omni-Means, a GHD Company

The Holman Highway Roundabout represents a new paradigm in transportation design. No longer is it necessary to consider only traffic signals for highly congested intersections. The roundabout solution addressed all of the unique characteristics of the area while relieving congestion, improving emergency response times, and creating a sustainable gateway to the Monterey Peninsula and Pebble Beach Community. The designers maximized roundabout design principles and leveraged the more efficient operations and superior capacity of roundabouts to minimize upstream and downstream roadway improvements. This project cost $8.5 million and replaced a previously approved widening project that had an estimated cost of $21 million and included a bridge replacement, signalized intersection, and a significant visual impact on a scenic corridor. The project was completed in September 2017 within the intended time frame and on-budget with no claims during construction and is a new jewel on the Monterey Peninsula, albeit a much more affordable one.


Traveler and Worker Safety

Route 101 Calabasas Precast Panel Roadway Rehabilitation

  • Myers & Sons Construction
  • Caltrans District 7
On the Scofield Bridge Deck Replacement Project, Myers teams encountered a Honda Civic neatly parked within the falsework. Photo courtesy of Kurtis Frailey, Myers and Sons.
On the Scofield Bridge Deck Replacement Project, Myers teams encountered a Honda Civic neatly parked within the falsework. Photo courtesy of Kurtis Frailey, Myers and Sons.

Wrong-way and impaired drivers are an increasing risk in highway work zones. Nationally, about 355 people die each year in wrong-way crashes. The Federal Highway Administration estimates 96,626 crashes happened in work zones in 2016, an increase of 7.8 percent over 2015. On the Route 101 Calabasas Precast Panel Roadway Rehabilitation project, Myers & Sons focused on using the Early Action Barrier System approach. This system was originally developed by field superintendents and craft workers who witnessed the sharp increase of wrong-way and impaired drivers entering work zones from the end of the barrier. The system is designed to protect people from errant drivers trying to enter the zone. The key elements in protecting workers from a vehicle threat is establishing appropriate distance between workers and vehicles and slowing entering vehicles to give workers more time to react and move from the area. The barrier system approach exceeds standard Caltrans closure guidelines, has no effect on the driver experience within the work zone, and has minimal effects on vehicles exiting a work zone parallel to traffic.


Community Enhancement

Marin County State Route 1 Repair Guidelines

  • Caltrans District 4
  • California Coastal Commission
  • Golden Gate National Recreation Area
  • Marin County
Storm Damage Repair nearing Completion at Marin State Route 1
Showing Buried Retaining Wall and Revegetation in Progress. Photo courtesy of Caltrans District 4.
Storm Damage Repair nearing Completion at Marin State Route 1 Showing Buried Retaining Wall and Revegetation in Progress. Photo courtesy of Caltrans District 4.

State Route 1 draws visitors to state and national parks, natural food farms, and ranches. The natural forces that formed this unique landscape also imperil it. The recurring need for storm and landslide repairs endangers both the beauty and economy of the region. The “Marin County State Routes 1 Guidelines” streamlines repair projects in a complex regulatory environment. State Route 1 serves as a vital corridor along the California coastline for local residents as well as millions of visitors who tour the region. Closure on this highway from frequent storms and landslides threaten residents and businesses, and inconvenience visitors. The Guidelines provide a corridor-centric approach that ensure consistent, accelerated repairs, maintains public safety, and respects the region’s exceptional scenic and environmental qualities.


Maintenance – Operations or Equipment

Swarm Maintenance/GSA 57-Hour Closure

  • Caltrans District 11
Swarm Maintenance crews in Caltrans District 11 in San Diego. Photo courtesy of Hayden Manning, District 11
Swarm Maintenance crews in Caltrans District 11 in San Diego. Photo courtesy of Hayden Manning, District 11

As a result of a planned 57-hour closure of southbound Interstate 5 and southbound I-805 by the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) in San Ysidro and the international border with Mexico, Caltrans maintenance crews developed and used a swarm maintenance operation to address routine and needed maintenance activities on the closed segments of both interstates on September 23 and 24, 2017. The crews of the south bay area of District 11 San Diego worked closely with internal and external partners to perform swarm maintenance. This effort involved coordination with internal Caltrans partners, as well as external partners, including the GSA, GSA contractor Atkinson-Clark, and the California Highway Patrol. More than 10 maintenance crews helped accomplish maintenance tasks that would have required over 25 separate closures. The super closure was completed ahead of schedule, with no delay to the prime contractor, using over 80 Caltrans maintenance employees and over 40 public service workers.


Highway as a Main Street

Fulton Street Reconstruction Project

  • City of Fresno
  • Royston, Hanamoto, Alley & Abbey
  • American Paving Company
  • Provost & Pritchard
September 29, 2017, Fulton Street is open for business. Photo courtesy of Randall Morrison, City of Fresno.
September 29, 2017, Fulton Street is open for business. Photo courtesy of Randall Morrison, City of Fresno.

The Fulton mall was the historic site of Fresno’s “main street” and the soul of its downtown. In its heyday, Fulton was the central urban destination for a four-county region in California’s San Joaquin Valley that is now home to over 1.6 million people. Closed to vehicle traffic in 1964, these six blocks of Fulton and three cross streets suffered economic decline for over four decades, reaching a state of total decay. Today the Fulton mall no longer exists; in its place is a rejuvenated “main street” with a complete street design using modern technologies and a remarkably nostalgic preservation of the key features and designs of the Fulton mall. The $20 million dollar Fulton street reconstruction project improved the half-mile stretch of the Fulton mall between Tuolumne Street and Inyo Street. The old pedestrian mall was completely removed and reconstructed with a complete streets design that included reintroducing two-way vehicular traffic balanced by pedestrian-oriented amenities.


Transportation Innovations to Improve Mobility Across California

MacArthur 580 On/Off Ramp Reconstruction

  • Caltrans District 4
West MacArthur on-ramp/off-ramp reconstruction to Interstate 580 at San Pablo Avenue in Alameda County. Photo by Caltrans District 4 Photographer John Huseby
West MacArthur on-ramp/off-ramp reconstruction to Interstate 580 at San Pablo Avenue in Alameda County. Photo by Caltrans District 4 Photographer John Huseby

The Interstate 580 MacArthur Ramp Structure Trench Section was constructed in 1936 and consists of two concrete retaining walls with a concrete seal slab between them. The 2016 storms caused increased groundwater seepage, and investigations revealed this was likely due to failed water seals and a failed system designed in 1947 to capture groundwater that passed the seals. Caltrans fixed the issues without cutting the seal slab or compromising the structure. An innovative solution used a permeable subsurface fabric to capture water at the slab joints. New horizontal drains were designed to dewater up to 20 feet behind the walls, and a hollow curb section captures groundwater and storm water. District 4 also worked closely with the City of Oakland to improve bicycle safety at the ramp exit by reducing the lanes from two to one in the eastbound direction, allowing for an 8–foot shoulder for maintenance within the trench section. This unique solution created a safer road for motorists, maintenance workers, and bicyclists and greatly reduced cost and time compared with replacing the retaining structure.


Public Awareness Campaigns

91/Perris Valley Line

  • Riverside County Transportation Commission
Through its extensive public awareness campaign, RCTC made the public aware of the new service being offered and educated communities about the dangers around railroad tracks. Photo courtesy of Ariel Alcon Tapia, Arellano Associates.
Through its extensive public awareness campaign, RCTC made the public aware of the new service being offered and educated communities about the dangers around railroad tracks. Photo courtesy of Ariel Alcon Tapia, Arellano Associates.

The Riverside County Transportation Commission and Metrolink began passenger rail service on the 91/Perris Valley Line, a 24-mile extension from Downtown Riverside to South Perris, on June 6, 2016. The first Metrolink extension since 1994, this new line added four new stations, and commuters in the Perris Valley and Temecula Valley are now connected to the 538-mile network that Metrolink operates in Riverside, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, San Bernardino, and northern San Diego counties. Riverside County is one of the nation’s fastest growing areas, and with housing and business booming, the vehicle traffic on local roadways is expected to increase significantly. The 91/Perris Valley Line is helping relieve traffic congestion along its entire route, while offering a new transportation alternative to the community. Since opening the new line, ridership has significantly increased and has introduced communities to a new form of travel. Ridership the first month exceeded expectations and has consistently increased.


Statewide Alerts and Other Information

Contact Information

General Information:

General Information Line: (916) 654-2852

Media Inquiries:
Find your local Caltrans media contact on our
Public Information Officers page
or call our
Media Line: (916) 657-5060.

Submit a Customer Service Request

You can also call
1-800-427-7623
for current highway conditions or find more information about roads, traffic and travel on
Caltrans' Travel page.

Physical Address:

California Department of Transportation
1120 N Street
Sacramento, CA 95814

Mailing Address:

California Department of Transportation
1120 N Street
MS 49
Sacramento, CA 95814

Caltrans Logo

Translate