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Organization

23 CFR 200.9 (4)(b)(1) organization
The Department utilizes the FHWA policy guidance “Preventing Discrimination in
the Federal-Aid Program: A Systematic Interdisciplinary Approach, Chapter One”
(included as an appendix) to set the foundation for developing and implementing
the Title VI Program.

Interdisciplinary Approach
The FHWA policy guidance prescribes an interdisciplinary approach to implementing
Title VI. This approach requires civil rights and program specialists to work closely
to carryout their mutual nondiscrimination program responsibilities.
Title VI nondiscrimination policy impacts all transportation decision making programs. However, only those programs having significant impact on the public and business are emphasized in the following illustration and discussions. These programs are referred to as Emphasis Programs.
Transportation Emphasis Programs
Planning Process
Statewide planning
Regional Planning
Project Development
Environmental
Right of Way
Construction
Research
Design
Other Services
Local Assistance
Aeronautics
Mass Transportation
Rail
The Department’s Headquarters Programs and district offices play a vital role in ensuring
that Title VI Guidelines are implemented in the transportation arena throughout
California. Staff in the districts are usually the first point of contact the public has with
statewide transportation planning projects and programs. As such, they are the Office
of Civil Rights’ eyes and ears in the communities they serve. It is also the district’s
responsibility to not only involve all affected persons in the planning and project
development processes but to work with the Metropolitan Planning Organizations
(MPOs) and the Regional Transportation Planning Agencies (RTPAs) to make sure they
involve the public in their plans and projects.
Department of Transportation
Title VI Program Interdisciplinary Concept
Technical Advisor
Audits and
Investigations
Finance Administration
Accounting
Business, Facilities,
Asset Management
& Security
Human Resources Budgets
Labor Relations Innovative
Finance
Programming Policy and
Administration
Procurement &
Contracts
Traffic Congestion
Relief Program
Training
Director
Jeff Morales
Chief Deputy Director
Tony Harris
Civil Rights
Headquarters
Information
Technology
Application
Development &
Maintenance
Network
Operations
Strategic Planning
& Customer
Support
Emphasis Programs
Program Area Administrator
District Title VI Liaison
Legal
Planning and
Modal Programs
Maintenance &
Operations
Equipment Aeronautics
Maintenance Local Assistance
Mass
Transportation
New Technology
and Research
Traffic Operations Rail
Transportation
Planning
Transportation
Systems
Information
Assistant to the
Director
External Affairs
Project Delivery
District 1
Construction
District 2
District 3
Design
District 4
District 5
Engineering
Services District 6
District 7
District 8 Environmental
Analysis
District 9
District 10 Project
Management
District 11
District 12
Right of Way
14 organization
Roles and Responsibilities - General
The Department’s role involves implementing Title VI, developing the Title VI Program
and establishing policies and procedures for identifying and addressing Title VI issues.
A Title VI Coordinator was appointed by the Deputy Director of Civil Rights in April
2000 to spearhead the coordination of this effort. All department employees and
subrecipients share Title VI responsibility.
The Director and the Chief Deputy Director
sign nondiscrimination assurances and support and provide resources for the development
and implementation of the Title VI Program.
The Deputy Director for Civil Rights
provides leadership and enforces compliance with Title VI through compliance reviews
and certification of department programs and subrecipients. Provides input on department
policy directives and develops overall civil rights department guidance. Coordinates
and prepares the Annual Element submitted to FHWA.
The Deputy Directors, Assistant Directors, District Directors and Division Chiefs
promote awareness on Title VI issues and ensure that the Department’s actions and
services are consistent with policy guidance and with existing Federal and State laws
and regulations.
The Legal Division
is a full-service law office and represents the Department and the State in hundreds
of lawsuits each year and provides legal advice and assistance for management and
staff at headquarters and in the districts.
The Deputy Director for Planning and Modal Divisions
oversees the development of policies for planning and the modal divisions and ensures
transportation planning processes, products and services comply with Title VI.
The Chief for Division of Transportation Planning
develops policies and programs to implement and coordinate transportation equity in
the planning process. Works with districts, regional planning agencies, Federal agencies
and other appropriate entities. Develops strategies to improve the participation of
under represented groups in planning and decision making. Provides for sufficient and
appropriate data equity analysis and studies for transportation decisions and technical
assistance to address and promote Title VI.
The Chief for Division of Environmental Analysis
ensures compliance with Title VI during project development and within the National
Environmental Policy Act process. Conducts project level and community impact
assessments concerning adverse environmental, economic, health and social issues
15 organization
during project development. Provides guidance to internal and external environmental
planners on ways to understand, measure and minimize or avoid adverse project impacts
on the human environment.
The Chief for Division of Right of Way
ensures that the property acquisition for construction transportation projects and
its affects are in accordance with Federal and State laws including Title VI requirements.
The Chief for Division of Design
ensures project plans, specifications and estimates conform with Federal and State laws
including Title VI requirements. Through Project Development Teams, ensures mitigation
measures are carried out.
The Chief for Division of Construction
ensures the delivery of quality transportation products and services that comply with
Title VI during project delivery including mitigation measures. Establishes the division’s
direction, definition, policy and objectives. Develops and uses performance measures
to determine program efficiency and effectiveness.
The Chief for Division of Engineering Services
ensures that construction contracts are consistent with Federal and State contracting
laws and regulations including Title VI requirements. Conducts outreach to promote
the participation of small, disadvantaged, minority, women and disabled veterans business
enterprises in the Department’s construction contracts.
The Chief for Division of Procurement and Contracts
ensures that department service contracts and construction contracts under $120,000
are consistent with existing Federal and State contracting laws and regulations including
Title VI requirements.
The Chief for Division of New Technology and Research (NT&R)
in collaboration with academic and industry partners, including minority institutions,
is responsible for developing innovative technologies to build the transportation system
of the 21st century in accordance with Title VI requirements. In addition, the NT&R
Program works closely with other Department programs and State agencies to provide
design, construction and maintenance solutions to day-to-day problems.
The Chief for Division of Local Assistance
ensures that all local agencies receiving Federal-aid funds through the Department
are fully informed of and comply with Title VI requirements.
The Chief for Division of Human Resources
ensures nondiscrimination in its policy and procedures for quality personnel management
practices including translation services for Limited English Proficient bilingual service. 16 organization
Division Managers
actively participate to maintain compliance with Title VI requirements and provide
appropriate resources, time and training to deliver the products and services.
District Division Chiefs for Planning, Public Transportation and Programming
ensure planning activities comply with Title VI. Work with local and regional planning
agencies to maintain a coordinated effort.
District Division Chiefs for Environmental Program and Project Delivery
ensure activities comply with Title VI requirements in developing, evaluating and
implementing transportation projects.
The Chief of the Native American Liaison Branch
ensures that within the Division of Transportation Planning, Office of Regional and
Interagency Planning, the Chief, Native American Liaison Branch serves as Department
ombudsperson on Native American issues and initial contact for Native American legal
issues. Serves as liaison between the Department, Tribal Governments and other involved
third parties to promote government-to-government relationships. Provides information,
training and facilitation services related to issues affecting Native American communities.
Equal Opportunity Manager,
Discrimination Complaint Investigations Unit conducts and ensures timely and comprehensive
investigations of Title VI discrimination complaints and reporting those
complaints to FHWA and Title VI Coordinator.
All Employees
comply with Director’s Policy Statement, Federal and State laws and regulations in their
day-to-day activities. Shall use context sensitive solutions, when applicable, as an approach
to plan, design, construct, maintain and operate the transportation system.
Regional Transportation Planning Agency/Metropolitan Planning Organization,
local city and county subrecipients
role is to have a continually cooperative and comprehensive transportation planning
process that results in plans and programs that consider all transportation modes
and supports metropolitan community development and social goals. These plans and
programs shall lead to the development and operation of an integrated intermodal
transportation system that facilitates the efficient, economic movement of people
and goods in a seamless manner across California.
Transportation planning agencies actively participate in maintaining compliance with
Title VI requirements and provide appropriate resources, time and training to deliver
the product and services consistent with these Federal mandates. This effort will be
conducted in coordination with a public comment period before a public involvement
process is adopted or revised.
17 organization
Roles and Responsibilities - Specific
Consultant, contractor, supplier, university and college subrecipients
role is to fulfill the scope of contract requirements inclusive of Title VI requirements.
23 CFR 200.9 (4) (b) (2)
23 CFR 200.9 (4) (b) (2)
The Title VI Coordinator
Is the Department expert on the Title VI Program Plan and Guidelines and plays a
lead and participatory role in the development and implementation of the FHWA, FTA,
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Title VI Compliance Program statewide.
The Title VI Coordinator:
• Provides guidance and technical assistance on Title VI matters and has overall program
responsibility for preparing required reports regarding Title VI compliance and
initiating monitoring activities including developing procedures and monitoring for the:
• Prompt processing and resolution of Title VI complaints.
• Collection of statistical data (race, color, national origin, sex, disability
and age) on participants in and beneficiaries of the Department’s programs,
activities and services.
• Identification and elimination of discrimination when found to exist.
• Prompt resolution in deficient areas.
• Pre-grant and post-grant approval reviews for compliance with Title VI requirements.
• Conducts Title VI compliance reviews of department program area activities and
cities, counties, consultants, contractors, suppliers, planning agencies and other
subrecipients of Federal financial assistance.
• Ensures that Title VI requirements are included in policy directives and that
the procedures used have built-in safeguards to prevent discrimination.
• Coordinates the development and implementation of a training program.
• Prepares an annual report of Department Title VI accomplishments and upcoming
goals including an annual update to the Title VI Program Plan that reflects organizational,
policy and implementation changes.
• Assists program personnel to correct Title VI problems or discriminatory practices
or policies found when conducting self monitoring and compliance review activities.
• Develops Title VI information for public dissemination, where appropriate, in
languages other than English.
• Refers Title VI discrimination complaints to the Civil Rights, Office of Equal
Opportunity, Discrimination Complaint Investigation Unit (DCIU).
Title VI Liaison(s), Headquarters
Work at the direction of the Title VI Coordinator to assist and support the Department’s
18 organization
Title VI Program’s role and responsibilities and are experts on the Title VI Program,
Plan and Guidelines.
The Headquarters Title VI Liaison:
• Advises the Title VI Coordinator of Title VI issues.
• Provides technical assistance to Title VI Program Area Administrators, District
• Refers Title VI discrimination complaints to the Civil Rights, Office of Equal
• Reviews policy directives for Title VI compliance to ensure that procedures used
• Conducts Title VI compliance reviews of department program areas and cities,
Title VI Liaisons and other program personnel.
Opportunity, DCIU.
have built-in safeguards to prevent discrimination.
counties, consultants, contractors, suppliers, planning agencies and other
subrecipients of Federal financial assistance.
• Assists program personnel to correct Title VI problems or discriminatory
practices or policies.
• Develops Title VI training modules and conducts Training-for-Trainers and workshops.
• Reviews and analyzes statistical data provided by programs on participants in
• Develops Title VI information for public dissemination, where appropriate, in
• Participates in pre-grant and post-grant approval reviews for compliance with
and beneficiaries of the Department’s programs, activities and services.
languages other than English.
Title VI requirements.
Title VI Interdisciplinary Team (T6-IT) members
provide guidance to civil rights and program personnel and serve as advisors to fully
implement the Title VI Program. This coordinated and cooperative approach of teaming
program and civil rights specialists is essential to adequately mitigate identified adverse
impacted communities and to ensure mechanisms are in place to avoid discrimination.
The T6-IT focus is to:
• Foster awareness of nondiscrimination requirements.
• Participate in the development and implementation of the Title VI Plan and Guidelines.
• Identify and prioritize areas of vulnerability and/or need.
• Formulate and prioritize strategies to address areas of vulnerability.
• Develop a Title VI Work Plan.
• Establish program roles and responsibilities.
• Act on the Title VI Program Plan.
• Continuously assess the plan’s effectiveness.
19
23 CFR 200.9 (4) (b) (2)
organization
Representatives from FHWA and the FTA are invited to participate in the process as
well. The T6-IT members include representatives from:
Division of New Technology and Research
Division of Procurement and Contracts
Division of Project Management
Division of Right of Way
Division of Traffic Operations
Division of Transportation Planning
Legal Division
Civil Rights
Division of Construction
Division of Design
Division of Engineering Services
Division of Environmental Analysis
Division of Local Assistance
Division of Maintenance
Title VI Program Area Administrators (PAA)
Understand the application of Title VI to their respective program areas and are
responsible for ensuring Title VI compliance in their respective divisions through policy
development, procedures and monitoring.
These individuals work closely with the Title VI Coordinator and Headquarters
and District Title VI Liaisons and function as liaisons between the Title VI Program
and the districts.
Title VI PAA:
• Advise the Title VI Coordinator and their respective management of Title VI issues.
• Ensure that Title VI requirements are included in policy directives, contracts and
program manuals and that the procedures used have built-in safeguards to prevent
discrimination.
• Ensure the collection and analysis of statistical data to determine transportation
investment benefits and burdens to the eligible population, including the minority
and low-income populations.
• Self monitor and corrective action within their respective division/district for
Title VI compliance.
• Provide guidance and technical assistance to program staff to correct Title VI
problems or discriminatory practices or policies.
• Work with District Title VI Liaisons to promote awareness of Title VI requirements,
policies and processes.
• Assist the Title VI Coordinator in coordinating and conducting compliance reviews.
• Provide the Title VI Coordinator with an annual report of Title VI accomplishments
and upcoming goals including program update that reflects organizational, policy
and implementation changes for inclusion in the annual Title VI Program Plan update.
• Refer Title VI discrimination complaints to the Department’s Civil Rights, Office of
Equal Opportunity, DCIU.
20
23 CFR 200.9 (4) (b) (2)
organization
• Develop Title VI information for public dissemination, where appropriate, in languages
other than English.
• Participate in pre-grant and post-grant approval reviews for compliance with
Title VI requirements.
District Title VI Liaisons
Work closely with the Title VI Coordinator, Title VI Liaisons, Title VI PAA and District
Equal Opportunity Officers to implement the Department’s Title VI Program Plan
through programs, procedures and ongoing monitoring in the district. District Title
VI Liaisons are located in each of the 12 district offices and are responsible for
ensuring Title VI compliance in their respective districts.
The District Title VI Liaisons:
• Advise the Title VI Coordinator and district management of Title VI issues.
• Promote and heighten Title VI awareness.
• Provide technical assistance to Headquarters, district and regional transportation
planning agencies, cities and counties personnel.
• Assist district officials with the review of local and regional transportation
agency Public Participation Plans, Regional Transportation Plans, Overall Work
Plans, Environmental Impact Reports, Transportation Concept Reports and other
types of plans and grant applications in relationship to Title VI requirements.
• Assist the Title VI Program with coordinating compliance reviews conducted.
• Self monitor and corrective action within their respective division/district for
Title VI compliance.
• Ensure documentation of Title VI activities.
• Assist in the preparation of the annual Title VI Program Plan update as requested
by the Title VI Coordinator or respective PAA.
• Refer Title VI complaints to the Civil Rights, Office of Equal Opportunity, DCIU.
• Ensure the collection and analysis of statistical data to determine transportation
investment benefits and burdens to the eligible population, including the minority
and low-income populations.
• Develop Title VI information for public dissemination, where appropriate, in languages
other than English.
• Participate in pre-grant and post-grant approval reviews for compliance with
Title VI requirements.
[public involvement]
Public involvement is fundamental and essential in achieving equitable transportation
that meets the needs of all persons in the State of California. Public participation
provides for public involvement of all persons (including Native Americans, minorities
and low-income persons), affected public agencies, representatives of transportation
agency employees, freight shippers, providers of freight transportation services,
private providers of transportation, representatives of users of public transit and
other interested parties of the community affected by transportation plans, programs
and projects.
public involvement
200.9 (4) (b) (12); 23 CFR 450.212; 23 CFR 450, 771; 49 CFR 21.5 (1); 49 CFR 619, 622; 28 CFR 42.405
How does a transportation agency grab and hold people’s interest in a project or
plan, convince them that active involvement is worthwhile and provide the means
for them to have direct and meaningful impact on transportation decisions. Public
participation is the key. Engaging stakeholders, businesses and the public early in
the project scoping, planning process and maintaining that communication through
project implementation is critical.
Department planning processes must include a proactive public involvement process
that provides complete public information, timely notice, full public access to key
decisions and supports early and continuing involvement of the public in developing
transportation plans and Transportation Improvement Programs. The public
involvement process includes the following:
22 public involvement
• Public comment period prior to initial adoption or revision of public involvement
process.
• Timely information about transportation issues and processes to all interested
parties involved and affected by transportation plans, programs and projects.
of transportation plans and Transportation Improvement Programs. Open public
• Reasonable public access to technical and policy information used in development
meetings.
• Adequate public notice of public involvement activities and time for public review
and comment at key decision points including but not limited to approval of
• Demonstrate consideration and response to public input received during planning
transportation plans and Transportation Improvement Programs.
and project development processes.
served by existing or future transportation systems including but not limited to
• Make a concerted effort to involve the public, especially those traditionally under
low-income and minority households.
• Ensure opportunities for significant input on a draft transportation plan or
Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). Summarize the input received and
include the summary as part of the record supporting the final plan and TIP.
• Where final transportation plan or TIP differs significantly from one presented
for public comment by a transportation planning agency and raises new material
issues which interested parties could not have reasonably foreseen from public
involvement efforts, an additional opportunity for public comment on the revised
plan or TIP shall be made available.
• Periodic review of the public involvement process to ensure standards are met,
to evaluate the public involvement process for effectiveness and to ensure full
and open access to all.
• Coordination of metropolitan planning processes, where necessary, with Statewide
public involvement processes to enhance public consideration of the issues, plans
and programs and reduce redundancies and cost.
• Ensure opportunity for full participation and provide accommodation for persons
with disabilities at meetings by:
a. Meeting in a fully accessible facility.
b. Providing notice that documents can be made in alternate formats upon request.
c. Considering accessible alternatives such as videos with real-time captioning,
the use of interpreters or Braille.
d. Effectively accommodating hearing impaired persons by providing sign language
interpreter or real-time captioning.
23 public involvement
The Public Involvement process includes the development of procedures for the collection
and analysis of statistical data of public participants in, and beneficiaries of State
transportation programs; establishment of procedures to identify and eliminate discrimination;
and identification and implementation of affirmative measures to ensure
nondiscrimination. The State, and any other agencies/organizations which are responsible
for satisfying the statewide transportation planning and programming requirements,
will accomplish this task through their integrated transportation planning processes
including the public involvement process for the statewide transportation plan and
the federal statewide transportation improvement program.
See Public Involvement appendix for reference tools that have been successfully used
by transportation planning agencies. requirement for all programs
requirements for all programs
The discussions that follow have been developed to address the primary areas of
concern regarding compliance with Title VI requirements. These discussions should
be considered at a minimum by all Department programs. The Emphasis Programs
and Other Services Programs must integrate them into their processes/procedures,
activities and services.
Program specific considerations are discussed in both the “Emphasis Programs”
and “Other Services” requirements sections by specific program.
26 requirements for all programs
23 CFR 200.9 (4) (b) (5), (6), (7);
23 CFR 200.11; 49 CFR 21.9
Compliance Reviews
The Title VI Program is required to conduct compliance reviews of Department programs
and its subrecipients. The purpose of the compliance review process is to determine if
the Department’s Emphasis Programs and Other Services Programs and subrecipients
are meeting Title VI compliance requirements.
A compliance review schedule will be posted in the fall of each year on the Title VI Program
website when the website is implemented, or contact the Title VI Coordinator and
request a copy of the schedule. Programs scheduled for review will be notified in writing
at least 60 days in advance to coordinate a date to ensure the attendance of the
Division Chief or District Director and key personnel. The notice of review (NOR) will
include a compliance review instrument containing questions that the programs are
required to answer in writing and return 30 days prior to the scheduled on-site review.
The Title VI Program staff will review the program response during the desk review
process in advance of the on-site review. The on-site review will be conducted over a
five-day period and consist of an entrance conference, review of files and documentation,
interviews and an exit conference.
A Determination of Findings (DOF) will be issued within a 30-day period following the
exit conference. A copy of the findings is provided to the Department Director, Chief
Deputy Director, Civil Rights Deputy Director and to the appropriate executive staff
of the program being reviewed, FHWA and FTA. No action on the part of the program
is required on findings of compliance, unless a condition of compliance is specified.
However, programs found out of compliance are required to develop a Corrective
Action Plan (CAP) to overcome any deficiencies noted in the DOF within a period not
to exceed 90 days. If it is determined that the matter cannot be resolved voluntarily,
by informal means, action will be taken to effectuate compliance. See the Corrective
Action section that follows.
District compliance reviews will follow the process described above with the exception
of the on-site review period. District on-site review periods range from 5-10 days
allowing time to include review of various program areas which may include planning,
environmental, right of way, construction, contracting and research.
The Department will attend the FTA/FHWA Triennial review of Metropolitan Planning
Organizations (MPOs) and will assist the MPO in addressing any corrective actions or
recommendations when appropriate. Local agencies compliance reviews will be conducted
by the Division of Local Assistance with participation from the Title VI Program.
The Department will not conduct Title VI compliance reviews of universities and colleges.
Universities and colleges are reviewed by the Department of Education for compliance 27 requirements for all programs
with Title VI. Rather, the Department will specifically monitor contracts with universities
and colleges for compliance with Title VI requirements.
23 CFR 200.9 (4) (b) (15); 23 CFR 200.11; 49 CFR 21.13 Corrective Action
Effective compliance of Title VI requires the Department to take prompt action to
achieve voluntary compliance in all instances in which noncompliance is found.
If a Department program or subrecipient is found out of compliance or is believed to
be out of compliance with Title VI, the Department has three potential remedies:
1. Resolution of the noncompliance status or potential noncompliance status by
voluntary means by entering into an agreement which becomes a condition of
assistance,
2. Where voluntary compliance efforts are unsuccessful, a refusal to grant or continue
the assistance is initiated or
3. Where voluntary compliance efforts are unsuccessful, referral of the violation to
the FHWA, FTA or Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) who will forward to the
U.S. Department of Justice for judicial consideration.
Efforts to secure voluntary compliance should be undertaken at the outset in every
noncompliance situation and should be pursued through each enforcement action.
Similarly, when an applicant fails to file an adequate assurance or apparently breaches
its terms, notice should be promptly given on the nature of the noncompliance problem
and identify possible consequences thereof and an immediate effort made to secure
voluntary compliance.
Oversight monitoring of contract/grant/permit/loan subrecipients is critical to ensuring
compliance with Title VI. This responsibility lies with each division and district. In the
event, noncompliance cannot be corrected by voluntary means contact the Title VI
Coordinator for assistance.
23 CFR 450.104,
450.210 (5);EO 13175
Consultation with Tribal Governments
The Federal Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) reinforced the
Federal emphasis on Tribal Government participation in transportation planning that
was initiated by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA).
Federally recognized Tribes are familiar with the Federal “consultation” process that
requires agencies to identify when the agency is formally consulting with the Tribe.
23 CFR 450.104
Consultation means that one party confers with another identified party and, prior
to taking action(s), considers that party’s views.
28 requirements for all programs
Tribal Government refers to the recognized government, or political unit of a Tribe.
CFR 23, Section 450.206
Federal law requires intermodal planning for the geographic area, which includes the
concerns of Tribal Governments having jurisdiction over lands within the boundaries
of the State. Considerations should include:
• Transportation problems
• Land use
• Employment
• Economic development
• Environment
• Housing and Community development objectives.
Issues may also include Tribal Governments’ concerns about projects outside their
jurisdiction that have the potential to impact their communities or cultural resources.
It is important to know with whom you are consulting and what methods are most effective:
• Each federally recognized Tribe is a sovereign government. Each Tribe has its own
form of government and protocol for how business is to be conducted. There is no
singular approach. Unless directed otherwise by the Tribe, correspondence should
be addressed to the Tribal Chairperson.
• Tribal leaders are frequently participating on their own time and money. Agencies
need to be cognizant of this and act accordingly; e.g., be flexible when and where
meetings are scheduled. A meeting with the Tribal Government (most often referred
to as the Tribal Council) is usually the most effective way to communicate.
• Providing enough time for the Tribal Government to respond is important. Most
Tribal Governments meet once a month, and it may be difficult to put additional
items on the agenda if not given enough time.
In 1999, the California Transportation Commission (CTC) adopted additional Guidelines,
which included:
Interests of Tribal Governments
The Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) process shall meet the Federal and State
requirement to consult with and consider the interests of Indian Tribal Governments
in the development of transportation plans and programs, including funding and
programming of transportation projects accessing tribal lands through State and
local transportation programs.
The Commission adopted a policy requiring Regional Transportation Planning Agencies
(RTPA) to address—in a current RTP—the requirements in the RTP Guidelines as a
condition of accepting a Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) for
29 requirements for all programs
inclusion in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Therefore, it is
important that the RTP reflect not only the method used to consult with Tribes, but
to identify what the tribal interests are and how they have been considered, including
funding projects that address these interests.
See the Native American appendix for additional information regarding the requirements
that govern the funding and planning of transposition projects related to issues and
concerns of federally recognized Tribal Governments.
Contracts/Grants/Permits/Loans Assurances

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