California Department of Transportation

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What are Transportation Concept Reports (TCR) and Corridor System Management Plans (CSMP)?

  • Caltrans System Planning function in each district prepares a TCR for each state route, which provides a long-term plan for that route. The TCR identifies current operating conditions and future deficiencies, provides a 20-25 year concept through a target level of service (LOS) for each segment in that route, and improvements across all modes of transportation needed to sustain or reach those targets.
  • A CSMP, on the other hand, outlines the multi-jurisdictional management of a state highway corridor experiencing delay due to congestion, with emphasis on operations and getting the most of our existing infrastructure. It includes analyses of existing/future traffic conditions and assessments of performance measures within the corridor, and recommends operational improvements, Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) strategies, and system expansion projects to preserve or improve performance measures within the corridor.

    The California Transportation Commission (CTC) requires that CSMPs be developed for projects within a corridor funded by the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), which was created by the passage of Proposition 1B in November 2006. This plan is aimed at ensuring that mobility gains achieved as a result of the project(s) are preserved over time.

District 12 Transportation Concept Reports (TCR)

The Transportation Concept Report (TCR) is a long-range planning document which outlines the conceptual improvement options for a specific route over a 20-year period. TCRs identify current and projected operating conditions and enhancements needed to sustain the multimodal system. The document is developed with the goals of improving safety and mobility for all users and meeting community and environmental needs along the corridor.

Not all TCRs are available online at this time. New reports will be posted as they are updated. Please contact Yatman Kwan at (949) 724-2731 for more information. 


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State Route 1

State Route 1 (SR 1), also known as the Pacific Coast Highway (PCH), provides access to and between coastal cities in Orange County. It is used by commuters and commercial carriers for recreational and interregional travel, and provides direct and indirect access to shopping areas and many popular beaches. The average daily traffic (ADT) varies from about 36,000 to 50,000 vehicle trips. Travelers experience congestion during the week in both AM and PM peak periods, and on holidays, weekends, and during special events. SR 1 is particularly congested at or near major recreational and tourist areas during the summer tourist season.


The TCR for SR 1 (PDF 75MB) was completed in 2012.

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Interstate 5

Interstate 5 (I-5), is the major north-south route that is used for interregional, interstate, and international travel and goods movement. It traverses diagonally about 44 miles through Orange County from San Diego County to Los Angeles County. It serves as the backbone of the Southern California transportation network, connecting the major urban centers of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties. The average daily traffic (ADT) varies from 115,000 to over 300,000 vehicles. Most major state and local routes in the county intersect I-5.

The updated TCR for I-5 is scheduled for release in fiscal year 14/15.

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State Route 22

State Route 22 (SR 22), also known as the Garden Grove Freeway, is a six-lane conventional highway in Los Angeles County and a four- to eight-lane controlled-access freeway in Orange County. The route provides access between cities in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. It is used for commuting and interregional travel, and provides access to employment, recreation, and shopping centers, medical facilities, and universities. General purpose lanes, High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes, and auxiliary lanes were added as part of a major reconstruction project between 2001 and 2007. The average daily traffic (ADT) ranges between 60,000 to 260,000 vehicles.

The TCR for SR 22 (PDF 15MB) is currently being updated, and is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 15/16.

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State Route 39

State Route 39 (SR 39), also known as Beach Boulevard, is a six- to eight-lane facility located within Orange County except for two short segments that are located between Rosecrans Avenue and Imperial Highway in Los Angeles County. It is a major north-south arterial that is classified as a Conventional Highway. SR 39 was Orange County's first Smart Street system, utilizing traffic signal synchronization, bus turnouts, and intersection improvements, along with consolidated driveways and reduced on-street parking. This route is used for local travel and access to commercial, entertainment and business districts. On weekdays, SR 39 is heavily used by commuters since the route provides access to four freeways (I-405, SR 22, SR 91 and I-5) intersecting this facility. The average daily traffic (ADT) ranges from 26,000 to 71,000 vehicles.

The updated TCR for SR 39 (PDF 26MB) is scheduled for release in fiscal year 14/15.

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State Route 55

State Route 55 (SR 55), also known as the Costa Mesa Freeway, provides north-south access in Orange County. It is the main route connecting the Inland Empire Counties to central and south Orange County. It also is the main route to the beach and tourist attractions in the county's coastal communities. The average daily traffic (ADT) varies from 48,000 to 223,000. SR 55's High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes were Orange County's first such facility and have been in operation since 1985. During weekday peak periods, the mixed flow lanes experience congestion and the carpool lane operates at near capacity.

SR 55 is part of the local arterial system from Finley Avenue in the city of Newport Beach to 19th Street in the city of Costa Mesa. From 19th street to SR 91, SR 55 is part of the freeway system. Prior to 1992, the freeway section of SR 55 ended at Mesa Drive and merged with Newport Boulevard, but this segment was extended to 19th Street in 1992. Caltrans relinquished Newport Boulevard between Mesa Drive and 19th Street to the City of Costa Mesa for local control in 1996. 

The updated TCR for SR 55 is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 16/17.

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State Route 57

State Route 57 (SR 57), also known as the Orange Freeway, is a major north-south route in Orange County. SR 57 is primarily utilized by daily commuters and recreational users traveling to sporting and entertainment events. From the I-5/SR 22/SR 57 interchange, the average daily traffic (ADT) on this route varies from 174,000 to 234,000. The existing facility is an eight-lane freeway with High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes for most of its length. During peak periods, the general purpose lanes experience congestion and the HOV lanes operate at near capacity. 

The TCR for SR 57 is currently being updated, and is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 15/16.

72

State Route 72

State Route 72 (SR 72), also known as Whittier Boulevard, runs from Beach Boulevard (SR 39) in Orange County to Interstate 605 (I-605) in Los Angeles County. From Rosemead Boulevard, SR 72 continues along Whittier Boulevard to Atlantic Boulevard, where it now terminates as a state highway route. Whittier Boulevard east of SR 39 and west of Atlantic Boulevard continues as a local thoroughfare.

The updated TCR for SR 72 is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 16/17.

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State Route 73

State Route 73 (SR 73) originates in the City of San Juan Capistrano at the Interstate 5 (I-5) interchange, traversing northwesterly and roughly parallel to State Route 1 (SR 1), I-5, and Interstate 405 (I-405) through the cities of San Juan Capistrano, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Hills, Laguna Beach, Aliso Viejo, Irvine, Newport Beach, and Costa Mesa. SR 73 is just over 18 miles in length, with the section between Greenfield Avenue in Laguna Hills and MacArthur Boulevard in Irvine being operated by the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency (SJHTCA).

The TCR for SR 73 (PDF 37MB) was completed in 2012.

74

State Route 74

State Route 74 (SR 74), commonly called Ortega Highway, provides interregional access between Orange County and western Riverside County and primarily serves commuters on weekdays and recreational users on weekends. SR 74 begins at the Interstate 5 (I-5) interchange in the City of San Juan Capistrano and heads easterly, roughly parallel to San Juan Creek. From the City of San Juan Capistrano, the highway exits city limits and turns northeast, traversing Rancho Mission Viejo and the Cleveland National Forest before terminating at the State Route 111 (SR 111) interchange in Riverside County.

The updated TCR for SR 74 was completed in 2014.

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State Route 90

State Route 90 (SR 90), also known as Imperial Highway, is a conventional highway from the Los Angeles/Orange County line to State Route 91 (SR 91), except for the freeway segment between Yorba Linda Boulevard and La Palma Avenue. SR 90 is a major east-west transportation corridor in northern Orange County and traverses the Cities of La Habra, Fullerton, Brea, Placentia, Yorba Linda, Anaheim, and unincorporated areas of Orange County. SR 90 is a four- to eight-lane facility and is 12.5 miles in length. A flyover was constructed at the Orangethorpe Avenue rail crossing in 2009 to enhance safety and relieve congestion. SR 90 is part of the Smart Street system, utilizing traffic signal synchronization, bus turnouts, and intersection improvements, along with consolidated driveways and reduced on-street parking. The average daily traffic (ADT) ranges from 26,000 to 68,000 vehicles.

The updated TCR for SR 90 (PDF 20MB) is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 16/17.

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State Route 91

State Route 91 (SR 91), also known as the Riverside Freeway and the Artesia Freeway, is an access-controlled, grade-separated six- to 12-lane freeway. It is a significant goods movement and interregional travel route. The average daily traffic (ADT) varies from 170,000 to 275,000. Travelers experience congestion during the week in both the AM and PM peak periods, on holidays, and during weekends.

The TCR for SR 91 is currently being updated, and is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 15/16.

133

State Route 133

State Route 133 (SR 133) is a freeway and a partially-tolled highway that provides access to the coastal area within the City of Laguna Beach, residential communities and employment centers in the City of Irvine, and residential communities located at the foothills of Orange County. The average daily traffic (ADT) ranges from 18,000 to 37,000 vehicle trips and 1,450 to 2,850 vehicle trips occurring during the peak period. Travelers experience congestion during the week in the southbound morning peak period at the southern end of the route. SR 133 in Laguna Beach experiences seasonal congestion, particularly during summer months. This report focuses on the non-tolled segment of SR 133, which runs between State Route 1 (SR 1, commonly called Pacific Coast Highway) to Interstate 405 (I-405). 

The TCR for SR 133 was completed in 2014. Please see below for the separate report addressing the tolled segments on the facility.

133

State Route 133 (Toll)

State Route 133 (SR 133) is a freeway from Interstate 405 (I-405) to Interstate 5 (I-5), and a tolled facility from I-5 to State Route 241 (SR 241). From the north, SR 133 provides access to and between the employment centers in the cities of Irvine, Lake Forest and Laguna Beach. From the south, SR 133 provides access to the Inland Empire through SR 241. The average daily traffic (ADT) ranges from 32,000 to 45,000 vehicles. Travelers experience congestion during the weekday morning peak period at the confluence of I-5 and I-405, but congestion rarely occurs on weekends. The typical weekday peak directional traffic flow is southbound in the morning and northbound in the afternoon. The peak hour traffic volume accounts for 16 to 18 percent of the total weekday directional traffic. The average weekend traffic volume is approximately 35 percent less than during the weekday and displays similar directional flow. 

The TCR for SR 133 (Toll) was completed in 2014. Please see above for the separate report addressing the non-tolled segments on the facility.

142

State Route 142

The TCR for SR 142 is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 15/16.

241

State Route 241

The TCR for SR 241 is scheduled for completion in fiscal year 16/17.

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State Route 261

State Route 261 (SR 261) is a tolled highway facility which provides access to and between employment centers in the Cities of Irvine, Newport Beach, and Tustin, as well as the residential communities located in the foothills of Orange County. The average daily traffic ranges from 30,000 to 41,000 vehicle trips. Travelers experience congestion during the week in the AM peak period at the southern end of the route, which merges onto and from Jamboree Road.

The TCR for SR 261 (PDF 29MB) was completed in 2012.

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Interstate 405

Interstate 405 (I-405), also known as the San Diego Freeway, traverses 24.18 miles in Orange County and is considered a bypass route to the Santa Ana/Golden State Freeway (I-5). I-405 is a controlled access freeway with eight to 12 mixed flow lanes and two to three High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes. I-405 provides access between cities that are located in both Orange and Los Angeles Counties, and carries more than 300,000 vehicle trips daily in some segments. I-405 also serves as a critical goods movement corridor connecting the San Diego and U.S./Mexico border region with the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles.

The updated TCR for I-405 is scheduled for release in fiscal year 14/15.

605

Interstate 605

Interstate 605 (I-605), also known as the San Gabriel Freeway, has approximately one mile located in Orange County and 25.75 miles located in Los Angeles County. The route runs parallel to the San Gabriel River from the City of Seal Beach to the Santa Fe Dam in the City of Irwindale. It functions as a major collector and distributor route that feeds State Routes 22, 91, 60 and Interstates 405, 105, 5, 10, and 210. Within Orange County, I-605 is a controlled-access freeway with eight mixed-flow lanes and two High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes. I-605 also serves as a critical goods movement corridor connecting the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles to the Southern California Basin and beyond.

The updated TCR for I-605 is scheduled for release in fiscal year 14/15.

 

District 12 Corridor System Management Plans (CSMP)

California Transportation Commission (CTC) required that CSMPs be developed for corridors with projects funded by the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), which was created by the passage of Proposition 1B in November 2006. As part of the statewide effort, the District has completed the following Corridor System Management Plans (CSMPs).

Please contact Lan Zhou at (949) 756-7827 for more information on CSMPs.

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Interstate 5

The Orange County Interstate 5 (I-5) Corridor System Management Plan (CSMP) was developed on behalf of Caltrans by System Metrics Group, Inc. (SMG).

Here is the CSMP Executive Summary (PDF 1.5MB).

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State Route 22 / Interstate 405 / Interstate 605

The Orange County State Route 22/Interstate 405/Interstate 5 (SR 22/I-405/I-5) Corridor System Management Plan (CSMP) was developed on behalf of Caltrans by System Metrics Group, Inc. (SMG).

Here is the CSMP Executive Summary (PDF 9MB).

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State Route 57

The Orange County State Route 57 (SR 57) Corridor System Management Plan (CSMP) was developed on behalf of Caltrans by System Metrics Group, Inc. (SMG).

Here is the CSMP Executive Summary (PDF 7MB).

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State Route 91

The Orange County State Route 91 (SR 91) Corridor System Management Plan (CSMP) was developed on behalf of Caltrans by System Metrics Group, Inc. (SMG).

Here is the CSMP Executive Summary (PDF 5MB).

 

District 12 District System Management Plan (DSMP)

The District System Management Plan (DSMP) is a long-range planning document used to manage the multimodal transportation system and guide investment decisions for the efficient movement of people, goods, information and services. In addition to ensuring an effective corridor management system that integrates all travel modes on and off the state highway system, the DSMP provides guidance on Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) technology applications to improve mobility and productivity within the corridor. The plan serves as a resource for informing federal, state, regional and local agencies, as well as the general public.

The DSMP was completed in November 2014

 

Freight Mobility

The purpose of freight planning is to develop strategies, policies, and methodologies to improve the freight transportation system in California. In District 12, the focus is on truck traffic, including intermodal connections to rail and air hubs, as well as the surface freight corridors from the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. Freight Mobility strategies are developed in concert with local government (cities, the county, the Southern California Regional Rail Authority), state agencies (South Coast Air Quality Management District and Air Resources Board), federal agencies (Department of Transportation and Environmental Protection Agency), and private providers of freight service (rail and air cargo providers and the trucking industry).

As public concern with congestion and air quality increases, effective goods movement strategies will have profound ramifications on the region’s economy and quality of life. There are currently several freight movement studies on-going in Southern California and the state. The California Freight Mobility Plan (CFMP) was completed in December 2014. The CFMP is a statewide, long-range plan with the vision of facilitating the efficient movement of freight and people while ensuring a prosperous economy, social equity, and human and environmental health. Please visit the Office of System & Freight Planning for more information.

Park and Ride Program

District 12 owns several Park and Ride lots strategically located near freeways and rail stations. In addition, planning staff work with private land owners, particularly churches and shopping centers near highways and transit hubs, to dedicate a portion of their parking lots as park and ride facilities during the regular work week. Under formal agreements executed and managed by planning staff, the lots are kept paved, striped, and well-lit; as additional peace of mind for commuters, some lots have Goodwill Industries donation centers on-site to provide informal surveillance during the workday.

Bicycle Coordination

The District 12 Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator is committed to advocating for the accommodation of all users of the State Highway System, with an emphasis on active transportation from the early project planning and development phase through construction and maintenance. The District Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator works with Caltrans, regional, and local agency staff to provide appropriate accommodation for bicyclists and pedestrians in and around Caltrans facilities, as well as facilitating and securing funding for state, local and regional active transportation projects. Bicycling and walking are both viable forms of transportation and excellent forms of exercise that aid in the reduction of one’s carbon footprint while simultaneously lowering the number of single-occupancy vehicles on the roadway. It is Caltrans’ goal to fully consider the needs of active transportation users in all programming, planning, maintenance, construction, operations, and project development activities and products as supported by Caltrans Deputy Directive 64-R2. Caltrans endorsed the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) Urban Street Design Guide in April 2014.